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The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug

The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
Out Of Stock
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
Model: ART00271The Jerrehian Mamluk Rug
The source of rug comes from the Jerrehian Collection of Oriental weavings. This rug with the unusual border was designed in the early 16th-century rug by Mamluk Sultane of Cairo, Egypt. The border initially appears to be a complex, geometric interlacing. The most common Mamluk border is one with alternating roundel and cartouche segments. Interlacing patterns are noted in Textile Museum R7.7 and R7.16,If the dating of this Mamluk to the beginning of the l6th century is correct, it is a type that could have been contemporary to the Geneva rug and served as a model. A link between Mamluk rug patterns and those of the Ottoman period, as evidenced by the Geneva rug and others such as the checkerboard and Para-Mamluks, may be strengthened.Attempting to read early carpets produced in workshops in Cairo provides an entirely different set of challenges. Cairene carpets, distinguished by their limited color palette, symmetrical knotting, and unusual construction of S-spun wool (Z-spun wool being the norm almost everywhere in the Islamic world), underwent a sudden change in design sometime after the Ottoman Turks conquered the Mamluk empire in 1517. The Simonetti Carpet was probably woven after the conquest but exhibits the "old" fifteenth-century style of the Mamluks. Long and narrow, it was woven on a standard-sized Egyptian roller-beam loom, capable of producing carpets of varying lengths. It consists of five major focal areas of design in an A-B-C-B-A pattern, meaning the first and fifth and the second and fourth areas are paired, while the middle is unique. We can easily term these five focal areas medallions, but they are geometric in both layout and detail, and their style (as opposed to the actual date of the weaving) predates the carpet design revolution that gave rise to the medallion format. We can surmise that the designs and colors of Mamluk carpets, with their unusual combination of insect-derived red, blue, green, and sometimes yellow, with virtually no undyed white at all, constitute an effort to create a recognizable brand in the early modern market, especially in Europe, where Mamluk carpets such as this, with their subtle coloration, incredibly detailed design, and mosaic-like layout of small and intricately patterned geometric motifs, constituted an appealing alternative to the more coarsely woven and brightly colored carpets from Anatolia, such as Ushak medallion carpets. While the weaving of carpets in the traditional geometric Mamluk designs apparently continued well into the seventeenth century, sometime around the mid-sixteenth century, Cairene weavers began to create an entirely new kind of carpet, using their traditional Mamluk materials, technique, and coloration but reflecting the latest styles then being created at the court of the Ottoman sultans in Istanbul. The design of the rug is interpreted by our designers, and soft colors are chosen for this rug.

Color summary:  4 colors in total
  • Gunmetal Blue  409 (Indigo)
  • Emerald Green  407 (Chamomile - Indigo)
  • Turquoise  330 (Spurge - Madder Root - Indigo - Walnut Husk)
  • Congo Pink  306 (Madder Root)
Group: Islamic Rugs Family Area: Mamluk Material of Pile: Natural Dyed Hand-spun Wool Material Warp / Weft: Wool on Wool Structure: Symmetrical knot on depressed warp inclining to the right Knots Density: 39x39 Pile (mm): 2 Production Place: Southeastern Anatolia – Diyarbakir Weight: 6.00kg Location: Tokyo Stock: Out Of Stock
Dimensions:

2 ft 6 in x 7 ft 7 in ( 77cm x 233cm )


    Price:
    $2,900
    Ex Tax: $2,900

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